We have a new category for "Solo Travelers Hints and Tips"

VernaVerna Posts: 4,217Administrator
We have so many solo travelers, we could use a category so new owners can easily find solo traveling hints and tips. 

Verna, Indianapolis, Indiana; 2014 T@B S M@X, white/red, INDIANA  H@@SIER; towed by 2015 Toyota Tacoma V6 TRD 4x4; T@B Administrator

Comments

  • NomadNomad Posts: 7,341Member
    Are you a solo camper if you have a pet along?


  • NomadNomad Posts: 7,341Member
  • gooseladygooselady Posts: 109Member
    Great topic, but I'm in a quandry on how to bring the hubby, along after only solo camping, lol.  My biggest concerns are: how does one make coffee, shower and change clothes, when there is someone still sleeping in the bed?  I'm scrambling for the tools to set up an outdoor cooking and changing station for me.  Oh, the ease of solo camping.......
  • ScottGScottG Posts: 1,553Moderator
    Are you asking out of concern for space, or are you worried about disturbing the other person?

    In my experience, space isn't a problem as long as the other person is in the bed. It's when you start trying to share the same tiny plot of floor that things unravel!
    2015 T@B S
  • CyclonicCyclonic Posts: 1,317Member
    gooselady said:
    Great topic, but I'm in a quandry on how to bring the hubby, along after only solo camping, lol.  My biggest concerns are: how does one make coffee, shower and change clothes, when there is someone still sleeping in the bed?  I'm scrambling for the tools to set up an outdoor cooking and changing station for me.  Oh, the ease of solo camping.......
    My wife sometimes gets up long before I do, and I am so sound asleep there is nothing she does that disturbs me.  Of course, it really is a YMMV type of question.

    While there is something to be said for camping solo, I would much rather have @schizokeet along.

    States the T@Bpole has camped, so far ;)
    Nathan & Becky... 2013 Ford F150 FX4 TAB HLR... 2012 LG T@B T@Bpole.
    Sterling, VA
  • PhotomomPhotomom Posts: 1,769Member
    If you're looking for a way to do some cooking outdoors I recommend a small butane stove, like the ones you see chefs using at brunch omelet stations. This is the one I have although there are many brands. https://www.amazon.com/Camp-Chef-Butane-Burner-Camping/dp/B002Z7WSJM/ref=sr_1_15?ie=UTF8&qid=1470918177&sr=8-15&keywords=Butane+burner

    On our 12 day trip, we left the 2 burner propane camp stove at home and did all our cooking with a grill and the butane stove. 
    John and Henrietta, Late 2016 T@B S Max in Western New York
    Nights camped in the T@B:
       H: 48
       J: 42
       Max the hound dog: 16
  • bgualtieribgualtieri Posts: 292Member
    Yes - that's what I do. A butane stove works great.
    2015 T@b S Max | 2015 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited | was PHX East Valley, now Dallas!
  • NomadNomad Posts: 7,341Member
    Been thinking about what the differences are between solo and not and the only thing I could come up with is you don't have someone telling you to stop and get directions :-)


  • VernaVerna Posts: 4,217Administrator
    PXLated said:
    Been thinking about what the differences are between solo and not and the only thing I could come up with is you don't have someone telling you to stop and get directions :-)
    Unless you use a GPS. 
    Verna, Indianapolis, Indiana; 2014 T@B S M@X, white/red, INDIANA  H@@SIER; towed by 2015 Toyota Tacoma V6 TRD 4x4; T@B Administrator
  • jkjennjkjenn Posts: 4,123Member
      PXLated said: Been thinking about what the differences are between solo and not and the only thing I could come up with is you don't have someone telling you to stop and get directions :-)
    A few off the top of my head.
    1. Storage space usage
    2. Safety/security (second set of eyes)
    3. Meal prep
    4. Bed configurations
    5. Water usage
    6. Grey/Black tank capacity

    Jenn Grover | 2015  T@b S Max Silver/Turquoise Trim | 2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland | Nights spent in T@b: 148 | Pittsburgh PA

  • mickietucsmickietucs Posts: 643Member
    Here's a few thoughts about traveling/camping solo (I'm still somewhat new at this so I'm sure others have lots more to offer):

    1. We can do this --- I was nervous in the beginning (hooking up, backing up, etc.), but as with many things in life, it gets easier with practice.

    2. Organization is your friend (takes a while to find "homes" for your belongings in the beginning, but it's so much easier to know where things are - then you can spend more time enjoying the experience).

    3. Safety? Be aware and listen to your gut. So far, my experience has been positive - I've found that campers and hikers have an unspoken connection of embracing the outdoors and are respectful and kind - not to say something can't happen but it can happen anywhere. I've only had one "I don't feel comfortable here" experience. It was in a county park and I had unhooked and had set up when a sketchy person pulled in next to me. I gave it a little time but decided it wasn't for me. Luckily the campground hosts hadn't processed my payment and were wonderful about deleting the transaction and understood - I hooked up and moved on. This out of 4 months on the road and at ~25 campgrounds. 


    Michele, Tucson, AZ. TV - '13 F150 & '16 T@Bitha special order.



    "Travel changes us. We don’t even have to try. We simply need a little willingness-and a decent pair of shoes."  (author - McCarthy, Longest Way Home...").

  • VernaVerna Posts: 4,217Administrator
    With mostly the same results as Michele, I've had absolutely no problem with others in my camping experiences. I, also, had one experience where it didn't feel right, and I left a free BLM campsite for a full service, but inexpensive, RV park.

    Here's some tips I've learned while traveling solo:

    Always put two chairs outside to make it look like there are two people, plus a place for a guest to sit and talk.

    Never admit to total strangers that you are traveling alone. 

    If a campsite or campground doesn't "feel" right, move on. There are other places to stay, even if they cost a bit more. 

    Try not to cook more than you have room to store the leftovers. In other words, you have a larger fridge at home for leftovers, and a smaller fridge when traveling. 

    A walking stick can be used for so many things--walking, hiking, propping open a door, moving stuff you can't quite reach, or putting between yourself and an unfriendly animal or human. 

    Don't afraid to reach out to others if an equipment problem comes up. Trust me, I've shared my phone number with others and I don't mind a call here and there. Even those with other types of Camper's are normally willing to help with a stuck stabilizer, a difficult hitch or they may have the exact fuse you need. Once again, trust you gut. 
    Verna, Indianapolis, Indiana; 2014 T@B S M@X, white/red, INDIANA  H@@SIER; towed by 2015 Toyota Tacoma V6 TRD 4x4; T@B Administrator
  • ericnlizericnliz Posts: 3,568Member
    Michele, Out of forty years plus of camping, I've only had the "I don't feel good about this" happen once. Snow camping in Utah when of group of three drunks came in to my camp, and decided they wanted my food more than I did. Ruger 44 magnum changed their minds, and I moved on! Gut feeling is always your best friend, 'ya just need to listen. That being said, I don't even think about going without my wife. When you have your best friend with you, it doesn't get any better! ;)
    2016 T@B MAX S-aka: WolfT@B
    TV: 2006 Chevy Avalanche LT Z71 aka: WhiteWolf, or 1972 Chevy Custom10 P/U aka: SnarlingWolf
    Eric & Liz  Spokane, Wa.


  • lazulibuntinglazulibunting Posts: 41Member
    Great topic idea! Thanks!
    Lazuli Bunting from Utah
    2005 Dutchman T@B & 2010 Toyota 4Runner
  • jkjennjkjenn Posts: 4,123Member
    Verna said:
    With mostly the same results as Michele, I've had absolutely no problem with others in my camping experiences. I, also, had one experience where it didn't feel right, and I left a free BLM campsite for a full service, but inexpensive, RV park.

    Here's some tips I've learned while traveling solo:

    Always put two chairs outside to make it look like there are two people, plus a place for a guest to sit and talk.

    Never admit to total strangers that you are traveling alone. 

    If a campsite or campground doesn't "feel" right, move on. There are other places to stay, even if they cost a bit more. 

    Try not to cook more than you have room to store the leftovers. In other words, you have a larger fridge at home for leftovers, and a smaller fridge when traveling. 

    A walking stick can be used for so many things--walking, hiking, propping open a door, moving stuff you can't quite reach, or putting between yourself and an unfriendly animal or human. 

    Don't afraid to reach out to others if an equipment problem comes up. Trust me, I've shared my phone number with others and I don't mind a call here and there. Even those with other types of Camper's are normally willing to help with a stuck stabilizer, a difficult hitch or they may have the exact fuse you need. Once again, trust you gut. 
    1. I don't put out any chairs - so not an issue.  I have heard some women put out a  pair of large boots.
    2. I had an uncomfortable experience at a paid State Recreation Area site and left for Walmart. :)
    3. I also never admit I am traveling alone- and will sometimes use "we" language." Another time, in Aspen, I realized my friend and I were being followed after I tried a couple of semi-evasive turns while we were walking. I waited until we reached an open, busy area and pulled her over to the side and said, very loudly and sternly, while looking at him, "He's following us." The guy took off, immediately. I am not sure if he thought he could snatch our purses or what, but my move sent him on his way.
    4. Don't boondock in areas that generate traffic - fishing areas, trailheads, etc...I had a solar panel stolen from such a spot.
    5. I sleep with my keys next to me - easy access to "panic" button.
    6. My dog is small - but carries a loud bark and hears things before I do.
    7.  I have been known to yell into the trailer, as if speaking to another when I wanted to give the impression that I was not alone.
    8. I politely turn down requests to look inside my T@b when on the road - especially at gas stations and rest areas.

    I will also echo @Verna 's suggestion about reaching out when you have issues. Not only are other campers helpful - 2x RV dealers have helped me out for free and worked me in at the busiest times of years. Neither were T@b dealers.

    To be honest, I had considered a pink T@b but realized I would be more or less advertising that it was woman's T@b.

    Jenn Grover | 2015  T@b S Max Silver/Turquoise Trim | 2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland | Nights spent in T@b: 148 | Pittsburgh PA

  • marilyncpmarilyncp Posts: 127Member
    Both @Verna and @jkjenn have all the right ideas... the one thing I do is also carry a Pitbull Flashlight Taser with me.  http://www.dixiemarketing.com/?p=348

    At night, it is next to me along with my keys for the 'panic' button as mentioned and my dog, who is also little but barks as soon as he senses danger.  What I like about it is, that it looks and acts just like a very powerful flashlight, but also has a strobe to disorient someone coming too close, which gives you enough time to switch on the taser. I chose to purchase locally to get the correct way to use it, which I suggest you do.  I'm not a gun person, but have taser, will travel!!  =)

    The other thing I do, and I know there are a lot of women who go to BLM or off-the-road type camping, is I stay in popular sites if I can.  I'm a planner, so I make reservations in advance so I know what I'm getting into.  I fell it is better to be safer than sorry....

    PS Thanks Verna for adding this topic too!!  :)

    M@rilyn
    Previous 2017 T@B S owner... c'est l@ vie
    But still passionate about the brand!

  • Smullis7Smullis7 Posts: 208Member
    I'm a BLM/off-road camper.  I do carry a gun...and a large dog.  :-). I also try to stay places that my husband has Been too and will have him go with me for a quick trip if I'm changing locations.  I'm mostly a weekend, get away from people type camper, so I've never done a solo road trip...yet. I always leave my planned location (with coordinates, if possible) with him and friends too.
    Sheila and the Mullis Pups (Winston, Morgan, Leroy & Dakota)
    M@bel M@y, my 2017 T@B Outback Max S (silver w/black trim), towed by Maude Myrtle, my 2016 Jeep Rubicon Hardrock.



  • VernaVerna Posts: 4,217Administrator
    An easy way to tell your family where you are spending the night, or however long, is to take a screenshot of where you are per the AllStays app (or whichever camping app you prefer). I text or email the screenshot of the campground info to the ones I keep in touch with. The screenshot even has the GPS coordinates, just in case they are needed. 
    Verna, Indianapolis, Indiana; 2014 T@B S M@X, white/red, INDIANA  H@@SIER; towed by 2015 Toyota Tacoma V6 TRD 4x4; T@B Administrator
  • jkjennjkjenn Posts: 4,123Member
    I use my Spot check ins to communicate my location. It has a GPS coordinates with a map link. Also, my text messaging app has Glympse built in which makes location sharing easy.

    I accidentally set off the I need help, but not life-threatening message on Spotify this trip and my phone lit up like a Christmas tree.it was like a fire drill. We passed the test.  :o

    Jenn Grover | 2015  T@b S Max Silver/Turquoise Trim | 2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland | Nights spent in T@b: 148 | Pittsburgh PA

  • NomadNomad Posts: 7,341Member
    I do what Verna does - Screen grab text message.


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